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[Spotlight: HRIC Advocacy and Media Work Against Media Restrictions in China]

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Human Rights in China's advocacy and media work has highlighted cases of media restrictions and other human rights abuses in China.

For HRIC's work focusing on the problem of media restrictions, see:

Press Releases

Below is a listing of HRIC's advocacy and media work against media restrictions in China, including press release, statements, and case updates. To subscribe to HRIC's press list, please e-mail communications@hrichina.org with "SUBSCRIBE" as the subject heading.
Publications

  • The Fog Of Censorship: Media Control in China - By He Qinglian. A Human Rights in China Publication. - He Qinglian's The Fog of Censorship, translated into English and published by HRIC in 2008, describes how China's much-lauded economic modernization has allowed the government to camouflage its pervasive control under the glossy facade of consumerism, with a shift from ham-fisted censorship to an elaborate architecture of Party supervision, amorphous legislation, stringent licensing mechanisms, handpicked personnel, and concentrated media ownership. (August 2008)

    • The Hijacked Potential of China's Internet - He Qinglian details the ways in which government controls have forced China to miss out on the full benefits of the Internet revolution. (China Rights Forum No.2, 2006)

    • Media Control in China - Translated excerpts from a 2004 book-length report written by He Qinglian and published in Chinese by HRIC. Media Control in China describes how China's much-lauded economic modernization has allowed the government to camouflage its pervasive control under the glossy facade of consumerism, with a shift from ham-fisted censorship to an elaborate architecture of Party supervision, amorphous legislation, stringent licensing mechanisms, handpicked personnel and concentrated media ownership. The two excerpts examine control through the intimidation of journalists and restrictions on media ownership. (China Rights Forum No.1, 2004)


  • State Secrets: China's Legal Labyrinth - A detailed report examining how China's complex and opaque state secrets system sweeps a vast universe of information into the state secrets net. The report makes available an extensive compilation of laws, regulations, and official documents, many in English translation for the first time, and details how China's wholesale classification of information has a powerful chilling effect on freedom of expression and the media. (June 2007)


  • Why China Needs a Press and Publications Law, by Li Pu and Wang Jianxun - The recent banning of eight books through informal and arbitrary means demonstrates the need for China to formulate a press and publications law to protect freedom of expression from arbitrary official whim. (China Rights Forum, No.2 2007)

  • China, Technology and Human Rights - A resource list providing a wide range of information related to China's development in information and communication technologies (ICT) and human rights protection. (China Rights Forum, No.2 2006)

  • Conversation with Citizen Lab - An interview with Citizen Lab's Ron Deibert and Nart Villeneuve on their work researching and monitoring Internet censorship. (China Rights Forum, No.2 2006)

  • HRIC Testimony: "The Internet in China: A Tool for Freedom or Suppression?" - Testimony submitted by HRIC to a hearing of the Subcommittee on Africa, Global Human Rights and International Operations in the House of Representatives Committee on International Relations. (February 15, 2006)

  • HRIC Case Study: Human Rights and Spam - A case study first published in the Center for Democracy & Technology's report Spam 2005: Technology, Law, and Policy. (2005)

  • An HRIC Field Survey: Logging on in China's Internet Cafés - This field survey describes the availability and locations of cafés surveyed; software and hardware installed. (China Rights Forum, No.3 2005)

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