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On March 1, the Regulations on the Implementation of the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Guarding State Secrets will go into effect. When first announced on February 2, the Xinhua News Agency presented them as “an effort to boost government transparency.” However, the regulations, read...
[Translation by Human Rights in China] See Chinese original . The concept of China's state security has achieved unprecedented political heights with the National Security Law recently passed by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, the suite of laws that have already been...
China’s revised Law on Guarding State Secrets (State Secrets Law) goes into effect today. Passed on April 29, 2010, the same day that a major policy report on the Internet 1 was presented to the National People’s Congress, the revised State Secrets Law is a legal upgrade designed to place broader...
In a revision of the central pillar of China’s state secrets system – the Law on Guarding State Secrets 1 (State Secrets Law) – the Chinese government has tightened its control of the flow of information in the digital age.
Excerpted from The Statesman : China is classifying more and more activities as state secrets to allow police to charge dissidents and activists with stealing or leaking state secrets, Human Rights in China said a wide-ranging report published yesterday. [...] Speaking from New York before the...
Excerpted from Associated Press : China's constitution and laws provide for freedom of expression and the right to criticize the government, but those provisions are routinely violated, often by authorities invoking rules governing state secrets, Human Rights in China said in a report Monday. The...
Excerpted from The Jurist : Human Rights in China (HRIC) said Monday that the state secrets system in China gives the government virtually complete power to halt the free flow of information, "undermining healthy governance and rule of law." The group released State Secrets: China's Legal Labyrinth...
Li Shaomin, Gao Zhan & Qin Guangguang have been released due to pressure from the United States, but Qu Wei, convicted in the same spying case, is serving a 13-year prison term. Below is some information about him. Qu Wei was born in 1954 into an official family. At the age of 17, he joined the...
After Huang Qi, director of 64 Tianwang website, was arrested for “illegally providing state secrets abroad” his 84-year-old mother Pu Wenqing once again urges the Chinese government in this open letter to release her son for medical treatment on humanitarian grounds. Huang Qi—who has been...
[English Translation by Human Rights in China, July 2009. Translation of Articles 1-51 based on the English translation of the 1989 Law of the People’s Republic of China on Guarding State Secrets by the Supreme Court of the People’s Republic of China.] The ninth session of the Standing Committee of...

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